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Old 11-20-2013, 04:17 AM   #81
R.B.
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Re: Iodine deficiency ! - falling intakes - goitregens - competition bromine and fluo

A highly thought provoking new fluoride alert video.

As previously stated fluoride is a naturally occurring substance which likely has roles in the body even if we are as yet unclear exactly what they are, (and the same goes for rare elements such as arsenic, which is commonly known to be highly toxic, but none the less in the tiny amounts to which we are usually exposed may have roles in cellular function). Fluoride clearly causes medical problems in inappropriate quantities, and but in appropriate amounts when applied direct to teeth has been shown to increase enamel hardness.

The problem is in the modern world we are at risk of having too much fluoride in our dietary / water/ tooth product / medical / airborne sources, and as a population are largely unaware of the dangers it poses in excess.

The situation is further complicated by the fact we are often deficient in other minerals, the level of ingestion of fluoride depends on the food source it is found in and the other minerals therein, and we are putting large amounts of fluoride into the environment which we ingest through air water and the food chain, all of which begs the question is the fluoridation of water still appropriate.



http://fluoridealert.org/fan-tv/10-facts/

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Old 11-22-2013, 12:10 PM   #82
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Re: Iodine deficiency ! - falling intakes - goitregens - competition bromine and fluo

A highly thought provoking video lecture by Jorge Flechas - he is clearly impassioned to communicate his experience using iodine with patients - it is sad there is not more research into the issues raised . . . as regularly observed there is great debate about what constitutes the optimal intake band of iodine either for repairing deficiency or ongoing maintenance. There is significant evidence that the Japanese have a much higher intake than those in the west; from 1mg a day up depending which source is examined - how much higher is debated - clearly there must be papers that support the higher intake figures in pregnancy but as yet I have not managed to find them - I will try harder


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uc4Q3kzBSc4#t=1865

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Old 11-22-2013, 03:42 PM   #83
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Re: Iodine deficiency ! - falling intakes - goitregens - competition bromine and fluo

See below a crash resulted in a duplicated post - apologies

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Old 11-22-2013, 03:45 PM   #84
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Re: Iodine deficiency ! - falling intakes - goitregens - competition bromine and fluo

^ This is a 2011 study

Iodine status of pregnant and postpartum Japanese women: effect of iodine intake on maternal and neonatal thyroid function in an iodine-sufficient area.

http://jcem.endojournals.org/content/96/12/3846.long

Based on the secretion of iodine in urine there seems to be a wide variation of intakes in pregnant women from insufficient to probably quite high. There is no suggestion that higher intakes were harmful, but equally the subject is not discussed,beyond reference to one or two figures.

Modern intakes may not be representative of historic intakes, and it will a long time before we know what is happening to the incidence of cancer etc.


ABSTRACT

"The rates of the pregnant and postpartum women who excreted iodine less than 100 μg/liter (0.79 μmol/liter) were 16.1% (110 of 684 women) and 35.7% (190 of 532 women), respectively (P < 0.0001). High iodine excretion greater than 500 μg/liter (4.0 μmol/liter) was found in 22.2% (152 of 684) of pregnant women and 14.1% (75 of 532) of postpartum women (P = 0.0003). Extremely high UI values exceeding 1000 μg/liter (7.9 μmol/liter) were found in 13.5% (92 of 684) of pregnant women and 6.6% (35 of 532) of postpartum women (P < 0.0001)."

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Old 11-22-2013, 03:54 PM   #85
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Re: Iodine deficiency ! - falling intakes - goitregens - competition bromine and fluo

http://jcem.endojournals.org/content/94/5/1683.long

Title
Thyroid function in early pregnancy in Japanese healthy women: relation to urinary iodine excretion, emesis, and fetal and child development.

Journal
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism 2009 Vol. 94 No. 5 pp. 1683-1688

Abstract

Context: The effect of constant rich iodine intake, especially during pregnancy, has not been well understood. Objective: The objective was to examine urinary iodine excretion and thyroid function in early pregnancy in Japanese healthy women. We also studied fetal maturation and child development in these women. Design and Setting: This study was an observational, prospective study conducted at a maternity hospital. Subjects: Subjects were 622 pregnant women who visited a maternity hospital consecutively in early gestation. Subjects with positive thyroid antibodies were excluded, and finally 514 subjects were examined. Offspring subjects were infants born to the maternal subjects. Main Outcome Measures: Thyroid function, serum thyroperoxidase antibodies, and urinary concentrations of iodine were measured at the initial obstetrical visit. The fetal maturation scores estimated by the Dubowitz and Ballard methods in newly born infants were assessed. A child developmental test was performed using the Enjoji Scale up to 12 months of age. Results: The distribution of urinary iodine concentrations was large, and the average was extremely high. There were significant positive correlations between urinary iodine and serum TSH (r=0.1326; P<0.005). Serum TSH during early pregnancy in mothers had no relevance to parameters in neonates, scores of fetal maturation, or child developmental testing in their infants. Conclusions: Iodine excess during early pregnancy seems to have no adverse effects on the fetus in healthy Japanese women. To avoid hypothyroidism, reducing excess dietary iodine intake to moderate intake may be beneficial for pregnant woman in Japan.


The official Japanese recommendation appears to be 3mg; the chart of urinary iodine shows intakes ranged widely and some were very high.

"Considering all the various factors together, the limit of iodine intake for healthy Japanese pregnant women should be around 3000 μg iodine/d, as recommended by the Japanese Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry (9)."

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Old 11-24-2013, 03:27 PM   #86
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Re: Iodine deficiency ! - falling intakes - goitregens - competition bromine and fluo

The above paper begs the question how well does iodine intake and urinary iodine correlate. This paper goes some way to confirming in general terms a strong correlation.

http://www.ymj.kr/Synapse/Data/PDFDa...ymj-39-355.pdf

Clearly the difficulties in assessing iodine intake because of the large variations due to processing and food preparation are significant.

But based on this paper it can be reasonably assumed that high urinary outputs do correlate with high intakes, so based on urinary iodine output cited in the papers above we can be certain that some Japanese do indeed consume significant amounts of iodine; further generally there is no indication that this intake has negative health consequences.

Of course nothing is ever simple, so higher urinary outputs for a given intake in some could be due to other factors including differences in transporter function, historic intake and so levels of tissue saturation including fat and muscle, absence of intake of iodine uptake blockers in so far as they can affect net uptake through the gut iodine transporters, other dietary differences such as polyunsaturated fat intake etc. It appears much is still unknown.

However overall if you have not at some point ingested the iodine it is not possible to excrete it, so it is inescapable that on a population basis higher excretion must point to higher intake.

I would find it surprising if nobody has looked at uptake and excretion in population groups known to have a high long term intake of iodine, but have not come across any such papers so far.

In the table in this paper the UK and USA have the lowest intakes, indeed the UK ranks towards the bottom of a global ranking of iodine intakes; no 7 in a list of
"The top 10 iodine-deficient countries (based on national median UIC <100 μg/L) with the greatest numbers of SAC with insufficient iodine intake in 2011. SAC, school-age children; UIC, urinary iodine concentration." Fig 3 http://nutrition.highwire.org/content/142/4/744.full

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Old 11-29-2013, 03:29 PM   #87
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Re: Iodine deficiency ! - falling intakes - goitregens - competition bromine and fluo

I have removed this post as the link seems temperamental which is a shame; and the post has no point without the link.

More in the next day or so - the antibacterial effects of iodine are currently on my mind.

Apologies for any inconvenience

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Old 11-30-2013, 10:02 AM   #88
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Re: Iodine deficiency ! - falling intakes - goitregens - competition bromine and fluo

Whilst looking for something on a totally different biological topic I came across these two blogs by an MD / radiologist on iodine and breast cancer.

The first http://jeffreydachmd.com/breast-canc...n-with-iodine/ is interesting because it points out;


"Potassium iodide has been prescribed safely to large numbers pulmonary (COPD) patients in amounts of up to 6 grams per day for several years. This is a well known treatment for chronic obstructiove pulmonary disease (COPD) which helps mobilize lung secretions. (18)"

Please NOTE the above amount is in GRAMS, US recommendations are in micrograms (one millionth of a gram) and Japanese recommendations in milligrams on thousandth of a gram - So 6 grams is a lot in terms of current dietary recommendation; 2000 times the Japanese recommendation of 3mg - yes this was /is? being used as a medicine and is not the sort of amount any Doctor I have seen is recommending as a normal dietary intake. It would be fascinating to know what side effects have been observed in what percentage of patients etc.

and also says


"The FDA has officially stated that Iodine supplementation is safe and actually recommends 165 mg of Iodine for adults in case of Radiation Emergency to protect the population from thyroid cancer. (17)"






The second http://jeffreydachmd.com/iodine-treats-breast-cancer/ is interesting for its extensive list of references set out in a clear format, along with some case histories report by Dr Brownstein in his book which were either not in the earlier version or I had forgotten about them .


"
Iodine Treats Breast Cancer, Overwhelming Evidence by Jeffrey Dach MD
Arrow points to Breast Cancer on PET SCAN

Arrow points to Breast Cancer on PET SCAN

Iodine Treats Breast Cancer, the Overwhelming Evidence

by Jeffrey Dach MD

This article is Part Two of a series. For Part One , Click Here.

Spontaneous Regression of Breast Cancer

David Brownstein MD reports three cases of spontaneous regression of breast cancer after women take iodine supplementation.(1) (This is reported on page 63 of the Iodine Book by David Brownstein MD.)

Joan, an English Teacher

The first patient, Joan a 63 year old English teacher, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1989, declined conventional treatment, and took 50 mg per day of Iodoral, (Iodine). Six weeks later, a PET scan (left image) showed, “all of the existing tumors were disintegrating”. Upper Left Image: Upper two frames is a PET scan showing breast cancer )(red arrows). Lower two frames is a CAT scan showing enhancing breast cancer mass, red arrow. Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Delores

The second patient, 73 year old Delores, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2003. She declined conventional treatment with radiation and chemotherapy. Instead, Dolores took 50 mg of Iodoral daily. A follow up ultrasound of the breast 18 months later showed,” It appears that these malignancies have diminished in size since the last examination. Interval improvement is definitely seen,” Two years later a follow up mammogram and ultrasound failed to show any abnormality and were read by the radiologist as normal.

Joyce

The third patient, 52 year old Joyce was diagnosed with breast cancer two years prior (left image), and started on Iodoral 50 mg per day. Three years after starting Iodoral, her follow up mammograms and ultrasound exams show decreasing size of the tumor with no progression.(1) . . .


MORE FOLLOWS http://jeffreydachmd.com/iodine-treats-breast-cancer/

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Old 12-01-2013, 05:03 AM   #89
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Re: Iodine deficiency ! - falling intakes - goitregens - competition bromine and fluo


Another accidental find, not what I was searching for but is fascinating.

If you open this link http://books.google.com/books?id=7v7...ontent&f=false
it will take you to a page of a book called the Iodine Hand Book.

The graph graphically shows the effect of food based iodine blockers on the uptake of iodine by the thyroid; the effect is significant !

Earlier graphs in the pages above the one referred to show that the body maintains fairly stable levels of T4 in-spite of the presence of food based iodine blockers where iodine is adequate.

Another graph shows the effect of iodine intake an blockers on thyroid size.

The relative distribution of iodine between organs and tissue in the body is presumably dependent on iodine intake. I postulate if intake is low most iodine will be found in the thyroid, but when iodine intake is high most will be found mainly other tissues. This would explain the different figures that are given as to the distribution of iodine in the body. The gender of the test animal will also logically have a bearing on the results.

It appears the body is protective of the iodine status of the thyroid, and the focus on it to the exclusion of other iodine research is distorting our views and knowledge on wider iodine metabolism.

The atomic and molecular properties of iodine, its size, potential to bond in many different ways, and odd snippets of research suggest we have hardly even begun to understand the wide roles of iodine in the body.


http://books.google.com/books?id=7v7...ontent&f=false

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Old 12-04-2013, 04:38 PM   #90
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Re: Iodine deficiency ! - falling intakes - goitregens - competition bromine and fluo

I do not have access to the full papers but from a wider perspective this is intriguing.

Firstly those with cystic fibrosis may commonly be iodine deficient, presumably due to uptake issues. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23107148(Low selenium may be an issue too it has been suggested - selenium is important to the metabolism of iodine)


and in 1956 an salivary iodine based test was proposed for cystic fibrosis of the pancreas.

All of which raises all sorts of questions and possibilities, and particularly so given iodine's association with the mucal membranes /systems / sweating etc


A SCREENING TEST FOR CYSTIC FIBROSIS OF THE PANCREAS USING ANALYSIS OF SALIVA

Wayne Hart,
Mansour J. Naime

+ Author Affiliations

Children's Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, Missouri
The Department of Pediatrics, University of Kansas School of Medicine

Abstract

A screening test for cystic fibrosis of the pancreas utilizing analysis of saliva for iodine after oral administration of Lipiodol® is presented. Tables provide the results obtained from testing 11 children who have cystic fibrosis of the pancreas and 30 children who have no evidence of this disease. It is indicated that the test can be easily and rapidly performed.

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Old 12-08-2013, 11:46 AM   #91
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Re: Iodine deficiency ! - falling intakes - goitregens - competition bromine and fluo

Essence = adequate selenium is very important if you are eating iodine rich foods viz kelp or using iodine supplementation.

This is a bit nerdy but hopefully the detail below will help with the gist; don't worry I do not understand all of it either (-:

This paper looks at the effects of higher iodine intakes on the thyroid and the response of the thyroid which includes the productions of selenium related antioxidants.

The graphs plotting the action of the iodine importer shows it reduces in activity, but interestingly does not 'shut down' totally. http://mend.endojournals.org/content...expansion.html

Similarly T3 and T4 fall but do not 'shut down'. http://mend.endojournals.org/content...expansion.html

This leaves me wondering how accurate the common descriptions of the Wolff-Chaikoff as a 'shut down' effect are, or if something different to what is observed in this paper happens at much higher intakes.

The idea of a healthy normal thyroid that efficiently and rapidly adapts its intake to the amount of iodine in the system has a ring of natures common sense about it - is this what this data and the Wolff-Chiakoff data suggests? - the data above raises the question was the choice of the description 'shut down' used for the sometimes rapid auto-regulation of iodine uptake / fall in hormone production by the thyroid an unfortunate one because it implied a reaction that was more dramatic than that observed viz rapid auto-regulation ? - hopefully there will be more research to answer these questions . . .

Also can extra thyroidal iodine when present in high amounts for example as iodine attached to lipids etc, and or extra-thyrodial production of related hormones for example from the ovaries in any way partially compensate for lower T3 and T4?

Much science has to discover yet methinks, and within the known sea of knowledge I am still not yet a toddler.

The paper is available in full - I hope that applies to you to


Regulation of Thyroid Oxidative State by Thioredoxin Reductase Has a Crucial Role in Thyroid Responses to Iodide Excess

Suzana G. Leoni,
Edna T. Kimura,
Pilar Santisteban and
Antonio De la Vieja

http://mend.endojournals.org/content/25/11/1924.long

"In summary, our results provide new information about the molecular events involved in thyroid autoregulation by high doses of I−. First, we determined that the rapid blockade of I− uptake in thyroid cells is not occurring in parallel to NIS mRNA and protein modulation and also that it is not caused by NIS internalization. These observations suggest an inactivation of NIS localized at the plasma membrane. Second, the incorporation of large amounts of I− increases ROS species in the thyroid cell above basal levels. As a consequence, the expression and activity of TxnRd selenoproteins increase to compensate oxidation and avoid cell toxicity. Thus, these selenoproteins participate in thyroid I− autoregulation by allowing the restoration of a normal thyroid cell oxidation state and NIS reexpression"

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Old 12-16-2013, 11:03 AM   #92
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Re: Iodine deficiency ! - falling intakes - goitregens - competition bromine and fluo

Here is another paper looking at the Wolff-Chaikoff effect, here again after ingestion / injection of a large amount of iodine there is a large fall in uptake, and temporary drop in T3 and T4, (T3 then recovers, and T4 increases) a metabolic adjustment but hardly a thyroid 'shutdown' as often described, in the in the normal sense of the word 'shutdown'.


http://endo.endojournals.org/content...expansion.html

http://endo.endojournals.org/content/140/8/3404.long
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Old 12-29-2013, 11:27 AM   #93
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Re: Iodine deficiency ! - falling intakes - goitregens - competition bromine and fluo

Hashimoto's

An interesting pair of posts on Paul Jaminet's site by a Hashimoto's patient which is well referenced and highlights the importance of selenium, possible benefits at least in some of iodine supplementation, and the fundamental importance of a balanced intake of both selenium and iodine to thyroid function.


http://perfecthealthdiet.com/2011/05...iditis-part-i/

http://perfecthealthdiet.com/2011/05...iditis-part-2/
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Old 12-29-2013, 11:59 AM   #94
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Re: Iodine deficiency ! - falling intakes - goitregens - competition bromine and fluo

Hasimoto's

Multifactoral - As ever it is important to keep in mind that most medical conditions are likely to be mutli-factoral, and have multiple associations with increased risks of other medical conditons Eg Hashimotos patients may be at increased risk of Pagets bone disease, http://europepmc.org/articles/PMC188...00365-0047.pdf which common bone conditions is linked with low vitamin D, begging the question is there maybe a link between low vitamin D and Hashimoto's . . .


The association between severity of vitamin D deficiency and Hashimoto's thyroiditis.
Bozkurt NC, Karbek B, Ucan B, Sahin M, Cakal E, Ozbek M, Delibasi T.
Author information
Abstract
OBJECTIVE:

The relation between vitamin D and autoimmune disorders has long been investigated regarding the important roles of this hormone in immune regulation. We evaluated 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) status in subjects with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and healthy controls.
METHODS:

Group-1 included 180 euthyroid patients (123 females/57 males) with HT who were on a stable dose of L-thyroxine (LT). A total of 180 sex-, age-, and body mass index (BMI)-matched euthyroid subjects with newly diagnosed HT were considered as Group-2, and 180 healthy volunteers were enrolled as controls (Group-3). All 540 subjects underwent thyroid ultrasound and were evaluated for serum 25OHD, anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO), and anti-thyroglobulin (anti-TG) levels.
RESULTS:

Group-1 had the lowest 25OHD levels (11.4 ± 5.2 ng/mL) compared to newly diagnosed HT subjects (Group-2) (13.1 ± 5.9 ng/mL, P = .002) and to control subjects (15.4 ± 6.8 ng/mL, P<.001). Serum 25OHD levels directly correlated with thyroid volume (r = 0.145, P<.001) and inversely correlated with anti-TPO (r = -0.361, P<.001) and anti-TG levels (r = -0.335, P<.001). We determined that 48.3% of Group-1, 35% of Group-2, and 20.5% of controls had severe 25OHD deficiency (<10 ng/mL). Female chronic HT patients had the lowest serum 25OHD levels (10.3 ± 4.58 ng/mL), and male control subjects had the highest (19.3 ± 5.9 ng/mL, P<.001).
CONCLUSIONS:

We demonstrated that serum 25OHD levels of HT patients were significantly lower than controls, and 25OHD deficiency severity correlated with duration of HT, thyroid volume, and antibody levels. These findings may suggest a potential role of 25OHD in development of HT and/or its progression to hypothyroidism.

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Old 01-14-2014, 04:11 PM   #95
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Re: Iodine deficiency ! - falling intakes - goitregens - competition bromine and fluo

More suggestions of connection between iodine breast health and estrogen metabolism; the paper also suggests that iodine may indirectly affect BRAC1 related metabolism . . . thought provoking stuff.

Interestingly breast health appears to be dependent at least in part on iodine rather than iodide and at least in part of the independent of supply of iodine by T3 and T4 indicating thyroid independent effects of iodine, in addition to possible as yet unidentified mechanisms




Iodine Alters Gene Expression in the MCF7 Breast Cancer Cell Line: Evidence for an Anti-Estrogen Effect of Iodine

Frederick R. Stoddard II,1,2 Ari D. Brooks,1 Bernard A. Eskin,3 and Gregg J. Johannes2
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2452979/

The protective effects of iodine on breast cancer have been postulated from epidemiologic evidence and described in animal models. The molecular mechanisms responsible have not been identified but laboratory evidence suggests that iodine may inhibit cancer promotion through modulation of the estrogen pathway. To elucidate the role of iodine in breast cancer, the effect of Lugol's iodine solution (5% I2, 10% KI) on gene expression was analyzed in the estrogen responsive MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. Microarray analysis identified 29 genes that were up-regulated and 14 genes that were down-regulated in response to iodine/iodide treatment. The altered genes included several involved in hormone metabolism as well as genes involved in the regulation of cell cycle progression, growth and differentiation. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the array data demonstrating that iodine/iodide treatment increased the mRNA levels of several genes involved in estrogen metabolism (CYP1A1, CYP1B1, and AKR1C1) while decreasing the levels of the estrogen responsive genes TFF1 and WISP2. This report presents the results of the first gene array profiling of the response of a breast cancer cell line to iodine treatment. In addition to elucidating our understanding of the effects of iodine/iodide on breast cancer, this work suggests that iodine/iodide may be useful as an adjuvant therapy in the pharmacologic manipulation of the estrogen pathway in women with breast cancer.


The high rate of breast disease in women with thyroid abnormalities (both dietary and clinical) suggests a correlation between thyroid and breast physiology 1-3. In addition, women with breast cancer have larger thyroid volumes then controls 2. Multiple studies suggest that abnormalities in iodine metabolism are the likely link 4-7. Additionally, the impact of iodine therapy for the maintenance of healthy breast tissue has been reported in both animal 4-7 and clinical studies 8, 9 yet the mechanisms responsible remain unclear . . . http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2452979/ FREE FULL TEXT


Evidence indicates that the impact of iodine treatment on breast tissue is independent of thyroid function. For example, iodine deficient rats given the thyroid hormone thyroxine (T4) did not achieve reduced tumor growth following NMU treatment suggesting that the effect of iodine on tumor growth is independent of the thyroid gland or thyroid hormone 7. Additionally, Eskin et al and others have reported that administration of molecular iodine has a greater impact on tumor growth than the equivalent dose of iodide 5-9. Since the thyroid primarily utilizes iodide as opposed to iodine 5, this data supports the hypothesis that iodine is not acting through the thyroid.

In addition to differences in the metabolism of iodine, the mechanisms of iodine and iodide uptake appear to differ. While iodide uptake is essentially via the Sodium-Iodide Symporter (NIS) in the thyroid, data suggests that iodine uptake in the breast may be NIS-independent, possibly through a facilitated diffusion system 12. Together this data indicates that the effect of iodine on breast cancer progression is in part independent of thyroid function and suggests that iodine's protective effect on breast cancer progression is elicited through its direct interactions with breast cancer cells.

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Old 01-22-2014, 11:15 AM   #96
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Re: Iodine deficiency ! - falling intakes - goitregens - competition bromine and fluo

Saw this and thought it worthy of posting - beware of OTC "thyroid boosting" supplements:

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/0...ef=health&_r=0

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Old 03-09-2014, 03:59 PM   #97
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Re: Iodine deficiency ! - falling intakes - goitregens - competition bromine and fluo

There is some powerful information, tables and graphs in this chapter of a publication on a site called Thyroid Disease Manager, particularly on the importance of iodine to brain development and function.

http://www.thyroidmanager.org/chapte...ncy-disorders/

It is fascinating that iodine is so crucial to a burst of brain development at the end of the first trimester and into the second 8-20 weeks - ergo pre-conceptual nutrition is fundamental.

Interestingly apparently iodine intake is important to the development of abstract thought!

It is scary the number of pregnant women who are iodine insufficient; viz 70% in the UK, and even in Australia where they iodize bread etc.

The cost of iodine is miniscule compared to the costs of deficiency.

Based on Japanese intakes and outcomes I strongly question the current western paradigm / fear to supplement based on the assessment that total intakes above 1mg may lead to unacceptable levels of thyroiditis etc; there is growing evidence that the problem is not so much higher iodide but a lack of selenium, and or other factors such as the presence of high amounts of fluoride, lack of vitamin D etc (See prior posts generally); which is not to deny in a few it may be a problem, but my guess based on the Japanese experience is that any risks that would be associated with food supplementation within reasonable bounds eg maybe targeting an intake level of 500micrograms, providing accompanied by selenium, would be massively outweighed by the gains in population based health and more subtle wider mental performance benefits.

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Old 04-06-2014, 01:56 PM   #98
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Re: Iodine deficiency ! - falling intakes - goitregens - competition bromine and fluo

This is a very useful examination of the Iodine issue on the Western Price site which contains some material I had not seen before.

http://www.westonaprice.org/metaboli...-iodine-debate

I found the reference to historic intakes in the USA of iodine particularly interesting " Thirty years ago, when iodine consumption was twice as high as it is now (480 mcg per day) one in twenty women developed breast cancer. Thirty years ago, consumption of iodized salt was higher than it is today; in addition a form of iodine was used as a dough conditioner in making bread, and each slice of bread contained 0.14 mg of iodine. In 1980, bread makers started using bromide as a conditioner instead, which competes with iodine for absorption into the thyroid gland and other tissues in the body. Iodine was also more widely used in the dairy industry as a teat cleaner thirty years ago than it is now. According to this argument, 15 percent of the U.S. adult female population suffers from moderate to severe iodine deficiency.1"

I would be really interested to know if they saw higher levels of hyperthyroidism, which is one of the regularly advanced arguments against increasing the current intake recommendations.

I had not really taken on board that in some countries salt was fluoridated for example it appears both Germany and Switzerland inter alia fluoridate salt

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16156167
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16156165

Is intake in those that eat a lot of salt maybe sufficient to affect thyroid function - is this a potential issue; I have no idea but maybe worthy of consideration.


As referenced above iodine in salt will sublime so and it appears that the amounts of iodine in table salt may vary considerably; but I suspect fluoride levels would remain more stable, so users could end up with most of the fluoride but not much of the iodine - as ever just more unanswered questions . . .

As pointed out by Sally Fallon matters of health and nutrition are rarely straight forward.

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Old 04-06-2014, 02:17 PM   #99
R.B.
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Re: Iodine deficiency ! - falling intakes - goitregens - competition bromine and fluo

http://www.vitamindwiki.com/Hashimot...ltiple+studies


Some great studies suggesting a link between low Vitamin D and an increased risk of Hasimotos


Relative Vitamin D Insufficiency in Hashimoto's Thyroiditis (2011)

"Conclusions: We showed that serum 25OHD levels of patients with HT were significantly lower than controls and severity of vitamin-D deficiency correlated with duration of HT, thyroid volume and antibody levels. These findings may suggest a potential role of 25OHD in development of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and/or its progression to hypothyroidism. "

Hashimoto's autoimmune thyroiditis and vitamin D deficiency. Current aspects. (Feb 2014)

Risk of Hashimoto's Thyroiditis reduced 19 percent for each 5 ng increase in vitamin D – March 2014

"Conclusions
Our study suggested that higher serum 25OHD levels was associated with decreased risk of HT so that each 5 ng/ml increase in the serum 25OHD levels results in 19 % decrease in odds of HT. "
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Old 04-06-2014, 02:25 PM   #100
R.B.
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Re: Iodine deficiency ! - falling intakes - goitregens - competition bromine and fluo

^ and does vitamin D have a role in hyperthyroidism

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3461753/

"We have reported significantly lower vitamin D levels in Indian patients with hyperthyroidism 2. In this study, 30 patients with thyrotoxicosis were studied for vitamin D status and bone mineral density (BMD). The mean 25 (OH) vitamin D levels in patient group were 15.3±7.1 ng/ml and 30 per cent of patients had severe vitamin D deficiency (<10 ng/ml). We have postulated hyperpigmentation of skin, malabsorption and increased vitamin D metabolism as possible mechanisms of vitamin D deficiency in hyperthyroidism3. Authors of the present study1 have not cited this important paper which was first reported study on this subject from India. Goswami et al4 have reported malabsorption in Indian patients with hyperthyroidism. According to this study significant number of patients (46%) with thyrotoxicosis in India had fat mal- absorption4. Absorption of fat soluble vitamins such as vitamin D is likely to be hindered in such a state. It is worthwhile to study correlation between steatorrhea and vitamin D status in these patients with thyrotoxicosis. "


http://press.endocrine.org/doi/abs/10.1210/en.2008-1191

Vitamin D Deficiency Modulates Graves’ Hyperthyroidism Induced in BALB/c Mice by Thyrotropin Receptor Immunization

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