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Old 11-03-2007, 01:44 PM   #1
gdpawel
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Red wine to overcome tumor resistance?

They found that very high doses of antioxidant polyphenols shut down and prevent cancerous tumors by cutting off the formation of new blood vessels needed for tumor growth. Polyphenols are commonly found in red wine.

The next cancer drug might come straight from the grocery store, according to new research published in the November 2007 issue of The FASEB Journal. In the study, French scientists describe how high and low doses of polyphenols have different effects. Most notably, they found that very high doses of antioxidant polyphenols shut down and prevent cancerous tumors by cutting off the formation of new blood vessels needed for tumor growth. Polyphenols are commonly found in red wine, fruits, vegetables, and green tea.

At relatively low doses, the French researchers found that the same polyphenols play a beneficial role for those with diseased hearts and circulatory systems by facilitating blood vessel growth. The amount of polyphenols necessary for this effect was found to be the equivalent of only one glass of red wine per day or simply sticking to a healthy diet of fruits and vegetables containing polyphenols.

http://www.fasebj.org/cgi/content/abstract/21/13/3511

In a recent study published in the British Journal of Cancer, phenolics contained in wine possess antioxidant and antimutagenic properties. However, it says that the alcohol itself rather than a particular type of drink is responsible for the reduction in risk.

Polyphenols found in red wine - such as resveratrol - are thought to have anti-oxidant or anti-cancer properties. Polyphenols are antioxidant compounds found in the skin and seeds of grapes. When wine is made from these grapes, the alcohol produced by the fermentation process dissolves the polyphenols contained in the skin and seeds. Red wine contains more polyphenols than white wine because the making of white wine requires the removal of the skins after the grapes are crushed.

http://www.reuters.com/articlePrint?articleId=USROB47387420070824

Last edited by gdpawel; 08-10-2008 at 10:52 PM.. Reason: revised
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Old 11-03-2007, 02:08 PM   #2
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Thanks very much for posting this. Someone should have told these people: http://www.dietandcancerreport.org/

They find no type or amount of alcohol to be safe to consume, but refrain from reccommending an all out ban as they recognize red wine may have a beneficial effect on the circulatory system. Clearly, there is more to the story.

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Old 11-03-2007, 05:24 PM   #3
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There seem to be contradictions in the conclusions here.

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"Drinking more than two glasses of red wine per week was associated with a 40-percent reduction in kidney cell cancer risk compared with drinking no red wine, the investigators observed, and there were similar trends for more than two glasses per week of white wine or strong beer.

In contrast, there was no relation between kidney cell cancer risk and consumption of light beer, medium-strong beer, strong wine, or hard liquor.

"A reduced risk associated with consumption of wine and beer might be due to the phenolics they contain as these possess antioxidant and antimutagenic properties," the authors speculate.

"However, the lower risk that we observed for three different alcoholic beverages and total ethanol intake suggests that alcohol itself rather than a particular type of drink is responsible for the reduction in risk."
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Old 11-03-2007, 10:39 PM   #4
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I think the contradiction is that they don't really know whether it's the drink or the alcohol in the drink.

Last edited by gdpawel; 11-03-2007 at 10:46 PM.. Reason: revise
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Old 11-04-2007, 11:12 AM   #5
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Smile Making the most of it

Thanks, gdpawel, for this. If there is that much benefit to be gained from red wine/alcohol, then maybe even greater benefits would be gained from both the antioxidant polyphenols in red wine AND maintaining a normal BMI as discussed in the study about maintaining a normal weight. And if one has to add consistent exercise in to keep from gaining weight with the extra calories in wine, that provides 3 ways to keep cancer at bay.

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Old 11-13-2007, 04:34 AM   #6
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Is it the alcohol in red wine?

Polyphenols found in red wine - such as resveratrol - are thought to have anti-oxidant or anti-cancer properties. Polyphenols are antioxidant compounds found in the skin and seeds of grapes. When wine is made from these grapes, the alcohol produced by the fermentation process dissolves the polyphenols contained in the skin and seeds. Red wine contains more polyphenols than white wine because the making of white wine requires the removal of the skins after the grapes are crushed.

What makes these two studies interesting in cancer is the anti-angiogenic enhancer and potentiator effect of the alcohol in red wine. What it seems to tell us is that alcohol reduces the angiogenic secretions by the tumor cells. If it does that, it could both reduce these secretions and make an anti-angiogenesis drug less resistant to the tumor cells, making it more effective. In the presence of an anti-angiogenesis drug, you can have a lethel 1-2 combination which knocks out the new blood vessels which are dependent for survival of the cancer. Polyphenols extracted from red wine could be converted into a pill that is highly likely to be safe, relatively easy and inexpensive to create, and deliver.

Resveratrol is a type of polyphenol called a phytoalexin, a class of compounds produced as part of a plant's defense system against disease. It is produced in the plant in response to an invading fungus, stress, injury, infection or ultraviolet irradiation. Red wine contains high levels of resveratrol, as do grapes, raspberries, peanuts and other plants.

Resveratrol has been shown to reduce tumor incidence in animals by affecting one or more stages of cancer development. It has been shown to inhibit growth of many types of cancer cells in culture. Evidence also exists that it can reduce inflammation. It also reduces activation of NF kappa B, a protein produced by the body's immune system when it is under attack. This protein affects cancer cell growth and metastasis. Resveratrol is also an antioxidant.

Many of the new gene-targeted drugs do not target enough genes. Cancer researchers now recognize hundreds if not thousands of genes must be down-regulated to conquer cancer. In one study, for example, at least 74 genes must be controlled in renal cancer alone (Cancer Biol Ther. 2004 Sep;3(9):889-90. Epub 2004 Sep 24). So-called promiscuous gene inhibitors must be found. A targeted drug like Sutent only down-regulates a small number of genes.

Resveratrol favorably switches many genes, and this has been shown in a renal cancer cell line (PMID: 15467424)(BMC Urol. 2004 Jun 22;4:9). It appears that resveratrol can target "all" genes involved in cancer. It is possible that it also chemosensitizes tumor cells, all the genes within the cell (a potentiator of chemotherapy drugs).

Last edited by gdpawel; 12-12-2007 at 12:22 PM.. Reason: revision
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Old 11-23-2007, 11:49 AM   #7
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Red Wine

Okay, as an avid red wine drinker I like where this study is going....But I have been told by my onc to give up red wine which I have not done. I believe my onc's reasoning is that alcohol increases estrogen levels and I am a triple positive.

Now I feel a little less guilty about my 2 drinks a day....
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Diagnosed October 2006 at age 37 wtih grade 3 IDC and high grade DCIS
Stage 1c triple positive, no node involvement but
vascular invasion
multifocal disease
Lumpectomy November, 2006
A/C every 3 weeks (started Jan., 2007 and finished March 2007); followed weekly Taxol (finished June 2007) concurrent with Herceptin (finished March 2008);
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Started 5 years of tamoxifen Nov. 2007; started peptide vaccine clinical trial at MD Anderson October 2008 and finished active part of trial in April 2009 (monthly injections of AE37 peptitde (HLA type specific) with GM-CSF or GM-CSF alone depending on if I was in experimental or control group); started Zometa infusions June 25, 2009- 4mg every 6 months for 3 years (taking it "off-label" to try to prevent mets)
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Old 03-25-2008, 09:54 PM   #8
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Mounting evidence shows red wine antioxidant kills cancer

Rochester researchers showed for the first time that a natural antioxidant found in grape skins and red wine can help destroy pancreatic cancer cells by reaching to the cell's core energy source, or mitochondria, and crippling its function. The study is published in the March edition of the journal, Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology.

The study also showed that when the pancreatic cancer cells were doubly assaulted -- pre-treated with the antioxidant, resveratrol, and irradiated -- the combination induced a type of cell death called apoptosis, an important goal of cancer therapy.

The research has many implications for patients, said lead author Paul Okunieff, M.D., chief of Radiation Oncology at the James P. Wilmot Cancer Center at the University of Rochester Medical Center.

Although red wine consumption during chemotherapy or radiation treatment has not been well studied, it is not "contraindicated," Okunieff said. In other words, if a patient already drinks red wine moderately, most physicians would not tell the patient to give it up during treatment. Perhaps a better choice, Okunieff said, would be to drink as much red or purple grape juice as desired.

Yet despite widespread interest in antioxidants, some physicians are concerned antioxidants might end up protecting tumors. Okunieff's study showed there is little evidence to support that fear. In fact, the research suggests resveratrol not only reaches its intended target, injuring the nexus of malignant cells, but at the same time protects normal tissue from the harmful effects of radiation.

"Antioxidant research is very active and very seductive right now," Okunieff said. "The challenge lies in finding the right concentration and how it works inside the cell. In this case, we've discovered an important part of that equation. Resveratrol seems to have a therapeutic gain by making tumor cells more sensitive to radiation and making normal tissue less sensitive."

Resveratrol is known for its ability to protect plants from bacteria and fungi. Purified versions have been described in scientific journals as potential anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic agents, and for their ability to modulate cell growth. Other well-known antioxidants derived from natural sources include caffeine, melatonin, flavonoids, polyphenols, and vitamins C and E.

A flurry of antioxidant studies in recent years has not proven how and why they work at the cellular level. At the suggestion of a young scientist in his lab, Okunieff began studying resveratrol as a tumor sensitizer. That's when they discovered its link to the mitochondria.

The discovery is critical because, like the cell nucleus, the mitochondria contains its own DNA and has the ability to continuously supply the cell with energy when functioning properly. Stopping the energy flow theoretically stops the cancer.

Researchers divided pancreatic cancer cells into two groups: cells treated without resveratrol, or with resveratrol, at a relatively high dose of 50 mg/ml, in combination with ionizing radiation. (The resveratrol concentration in red wine can be as high as 30 mg/ml, the study said, and higher doses are expected to be safe as long as a physician is monitoring.)

They evaluated the mitochondria function of the cells treated with resveratrol, and also measured apoptosis (cell death), the level of reactive oxygen species in the cells, and how the cell membranes responded to the antioxidant.

Laboratory experiments showed that resveratrol:

* Reduced the function of proteins in the pancreatic cancer cell membranes that are responsible for pumping chemotherapy out of the cell, making the cells chemo-sensitive.

* Triggered the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are substances circulating in the human body that have been implicated in a number of diseases: when ROS is increased, cells burn out and die.

* Caused apoptosis, which is likely the result of increased ROS.

* Depolarized the mitochondrial membranes, which indicates a decrease in the cell's potential to function. Radiation alone does not injure the mitochondrial membrane as much.

The team also wanted to investigate why pancreatic cancer cells seem to be particularly resistant to chemotherapy. The pancreas, a gland located deep in the abdomen, produces insulin and regulates sugar, and pumps or channels powerful digestive enzymes into the duodenum. This natural pumping process, however, ends up ridding the needed chemotherapy from cells in the pancreas. But just as reseveratrol interferes with the cancer cells' energy source, it also may decrease the power available to pump chemotherapy out of the cell.

"While additional studies are needed," Okunieff said, "this research indicates that resveratrol has a promising future as part of the treatment for cancer."

In the same journal, Okunieff and his group also reviewed why resveratrol protects normal tissue, and found that antioxidants can be designed to take advantage of certain biochemical properties or cellular targets, making them more effective.

University of Rochester Medical Center

http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/
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Old 03-28-2008, 05:34 PM   #9
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gdpawel

Thank you for posting. Fascinating. Thought provoking contradictions - antioxidants increasing oxidation at mitochondrial level!?

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Old 08-10-2008, 11:02 PM   #10
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The abrogating effect of alcohol upon VEGF

The online edition of the Journal of Internal Medicine reported the discovery of the first practical laboratory test to guide the use of new-generation drugs that kill cancer cells by cutting off their blood supply. The new test, called the Microvessel Vascular (AngioRx™) assay, was developed by Larry Weisenthal, MD, PhD., a medical oncologist who operates a cancer testing laboratory in Huntington Beach, California.

Tumor Cell Profiling is a test to show if your cancer cells were killed by exposure to one or more of the 20 or so different anti-cancer drugs that might otherwise have been considered as possible treatments for your type of cancer. It is a test that can help determine which cancer drugs would appear to be the best treatment plan.

The test works by measuring drug effects upon endothelial cells which make up blood vessels. Its use could prolong lives, save money, and spare patients exposure to harmful side-effects of ineffective chemotherapy treatments.

To have the test done, a biopsy needs to be delivered for the cells to be studied. Fees for a complete 20 to 25 drug "functional" Tumor Cell Profiling analysis are in the neighborhood of $5,000. The procedure is covered by Medicare and some insurers as well.

According to Dr. Weisenthal, therapeutic levels of alcohol in the bloodstream theoretically could be achieved simply by drinking wine or another alcoholic beverages in prescribed doses concurrent with receiving angiogenesis-inhibiting drugs. Dr. Weisenthal finds support in actual case studies reported in the medical literature.

Dr. Weisenthal says that he would like to see the test become available to patients worldwide through service agreements with larger laboratory companies or with a biotechnology company which might develop a testing kit for sale to hospitals and laboratories. He also would like to license the test to pharmaceutical companies for use in new drug development.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/118108.php

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