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Old 11-02-2013, 04:35 AM   #60
R.B.
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Join Date: Mar 2006
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Re: Iodine deficiency ! - falling intakes - goitregens - competition bromine and fluo

This is an interesting paper on estimated Japanese iodine intake which ties in with another report I have seen.

"By combining information from dietary records, food surveys, urine iodine analysis (both spot and 24-hour samples) and seaweed iodine content, we estimate that the Japanese iodine intake--largely from seaweeds--averages 1,000-3,000 μg/day (1-3 mg/day)."
See below

The report also recognises that pre 1950 Japanese ate a lot more kelp (Kombu)
"elders ate up to four times more than those under the age of 29" so their intake figures could have been significantly higher.

It is also recognised in the paper that intakes of iodine will vary considerably on a day to day basis, which is reflected in urine output. So on some days Japanese may be consuming many grams of iodine. "Urine iodine levels can increase from 100 μg/L to 30,000 μg/L in a single day and return to 100 μg/L within a couple of days, depending on seaweed intake [39]. This is somewhat expected when varying amounts and types of seaweeds are consumed on a day-to-day basis."

An analysis of studies of iodine in urine incontrovertibly shows the Japanese have much higher iodine levels than we do in the west, the data in the paper shows at least historically they had a much lower level of many western medical conditions.

It is also clear from the report that a variety of dietary seaweeds are very much part of the Japanese life, and that the seaweeds in food vary in iodine content for a wide variety of reasons.

The full paper is free and the implications are thought provoking, both in terms of recommended western daily recommended intake, and the use of iodine at higher intakes as a medicine to correct historic imbalances.



"Japanese health statistics linked to high seaweed intake

The Japanese are considered one of the world's longest living people, with an extraordinarily low rate of certain types of cancer. A major dietary difference that sets Japan apart from other countries is high iodine intake, with seaweeds the most common source. Here are some astonishing Japanese health statistics, which are possibly related to their high seaweed consumption and iodine intake:

-Japanese average life expectancy (83 years) is five years longer than US average life expectancy (78 years) [41].

-In 1999 the age-adjusted breast cancer mortality rate was three times higher in the US than in Japan [42].

-Ten years after arriving in the US (in 1991), the breast cancer incidence rate of immigrants from Japan increased from 20 per 100,000 to 30 per 100,000 [43].

-In 2002 the age-adjusted rate of prostate cancer in Japan was 12.6 per 100,000, while the US rate was almost ten times as high [44].

-Heart related deaths in men and women aged 35-74 years are much higher in the US (1,415 per 100,000) as they are in Japan (897 per 100,000) [45].

-In 2004, infant deaths were over twice as high in the US (6.8 per 1,000) as they were in Japan (2.8 per 1,000) [46]."


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3204293/


Assessment of Japanese iodine intake based on seaweed consumption in Japan: A literature-based analysis

Abstract

Japanese iodine intake from edible seaweeds is amongst the highest in the world. Predicting the type and amount of seaweed the Japanese consume is difficult due to day-to-day meal variation and dietary differences between generations and regions. In addition, iodine content varies considerably between seaweed species, with cooking and/or processing having an influence on iodine content. Due to all these factors, researchers frequently overestimate, or underestimate, Japanese iodine intake from seaweeds, which results in misleading and potentially dangerous diet and supplementation recommendations for people aiming to achieve the same health benefits seen by the Japanese. By combining information from dietary records, food surveys, urine iodine analysis (both spot and 24-hour samples) and seaweed iodine content, we estimate that the Japanese iodine intake--largely from seaweeds--averages 1,000-3,000 μg/day (1-3 mg/day).

Last edited by R.B.; 11-02-2013 at 04:47 AM..
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